Hippie Style of the 1960s Reworked into Boho Style of 2015

True hippie style of the 60s was so incredibly heartfelt and authentic. In my town of Hoboken, NJ during the late sixties and early seventies we were more of a combination of Woodstock and a Bronx Tale style hybrid. Hippie style was definitely low maintenance when it came to hair and makeup. Very earthy and natural. Clothes became a lot looser and flowy like peasant tops and gypsy style maxi skirts. Hip hugger bell bottoms like Landlubber paired perfectly with a tee or little halter top. Paisley, tie dye and florals were the patterns of the day and flowers in the hair were the adornment to wear as noted by the Cowsills. I loved the handmade clothing of the 60s like macrame tops and crocheted ponchos. One of my best friends crocheted me a poncho in the most fabulous shades of purple. It had a dual use, first as a fashionable wearable art and then ended up on my Mom's Baby Grand Steinway looking very old school bohemian. Jewelry gave more than a nod to the peace sign and beads were everywhere.

Bringing hippie style into 2015 takes a bit of imagination. The macrame and crocheted tops of the 60s have given way to beautiful blouses with white lace and delicate patterns worn loose and paired with denim jeans in a very modified bellbottom or shorts. Caftan dresses are above the knee and seem quite a bit more modern looking with see through gauzy material and studded with gold and silver twinkling embroidery. The floral crown is back and we do our rendition with vintage millinery flowers, crystals, pearls and bits of fantasy findings. We love to pair these with the ethereal caftan dresses. At our boutique our modern hippies love vintage ethnic jewelry and our collection of crystal zodiac earrings and pendants. The hamsa hand and evil eye are particularly popular with modern day hippies. The maxi gypsy skirt of the 60s is still well and alive but instead of paring it with a tiny halter top we see it worn with a simple demure (or not so demure) tank.

The incense of 1960s has transitioned into the incredible scent of Diptyque Candles in what else but Patchuli scent of course. What 1960s hippie or modern day hippie doesn't love the incredibly heady scent of patchouli? Some things just never change.

You've Got (Chain) Mail: Whiting and Davis Designs

Sometimes the best fashion moments fall out of the sky. Or in this case, stroll through the door. 

On a recent crisp, Boulder fall afternoon family friend Duke came into Frisk with a paper Whole Foods bags (this is Boulder after all...) Naturally, we were intrigued by the contents- kale salad on delivery? No...Much to our delight and surprise inside was an exquisite collection of 1960s, metal crop tops and dresses. Duke and his wife, Joan, are tres chic. He's former New York City architect and she had a long career at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (where she has rubbed elbows with likes of Karl Lagerfeld). The couple was relocating back to the East Coast. Duke thought long and hard about whom to bestow his creations upon, and decided to entrust us with the beautiful chain link tops, skirts and dresses constructed from classic Whiting and Davis material in the 60s. While working as an architect in Manhattan, Duke wandered in to the interior design department and saw this unique metal material being used for ultra mod squad curtains. 

 Whiting and Davis was founded in the late 1800s by three men outside of Boston. They were the first designers to transform metal mesh into fabric creating a mesh machine in 1912. Their beautiful purse designs are iconic, as are there snake jewelry and silver and gold bangles, baring their name.

Dresses made from metal got their start in the sixties. Paco Rabanne constructed his first dresses from metal and also plastic materials to produce a futuristic mod look. Duke took bulk amounts of fabric and opening and closing hundreds of prongs, meticulously crafted the pieces into incredible dresses and crop tops- several of which have graced the window of Lord and Taylor over the holiday season. Between the gorgeous designs he left at our store, and bulk the chain link fabrics of Whiting and Davis in gold, silver and copper for our own jewelry creations, we all were so excited for Frisk to have inherited such rich fashion history.

Duke not only left his designs, but old tools and detailed written instructions on how to make the clothing itself (which included an alarming highbred of fashion and...Math). What’s so striking is how modern everything looks. We love the plunging backs on the dresses and tops, and the rich metallic color palette of the Whiting Davis material. The silver dress needs only a pair of chandelier earrings to accessorize and the tops can be paired with a maxi skirt or knit cap to make it your own.

 Silver chain dress 

Silver chain dress 

 1960s Photo shoot 

1960s Photo shoot 

 Duke's family friend getting her dance on- 1960s polaroids 

Duke's family friend getting her dance on- 1960s polaroids 

 MOMA design guide 

MOMA design guide 

 1960s chain metal catalog 

1960s chain metal catalog 

 Fresh take on 1960s designs- metal crop top gets a glam grunge makeover. 

Fresh take on 1960s designs- metal crop top gets a glam grunge makeover. 

Frisky Finds: Valentine's Day Gifts for the Foodie

The foodie movement isn't going anywhere. Gone are the days of simply dining out- now it's a show. Food is a status symbol, the post modern Louis Vuitton or Chanel. "Have you tried (insert restaurant name)? No? Oh (insert faux surprised look). You must." Snackwells: Lame. Excessive calorie counting: Lame. Fast food...Don't even go there. Cooking fancy meals, dining out at the hot new place, or an old favorite, lingering over a glass of merlot with a stack of cookbooks and instagramming every delicious meal is the rage. Food is an experience, and most often shared with those you love most. With that in mind, some of our favorite Valentine's day gifts that speak to the trend. 

1. Canopy Skincare, Himalayan Pink Bath Salts $18. So what if our first pick is not exactly edible (or, actually, not at all edible) but delicious in a totally different way that nods to food. These luxurious bath are mineral rich and detoxifying, perfect for a soak after a sodium dense sushi dinner on Valentine's Day. With rosewood and rose geranium essential oils you'll be feeling the love long after February 14th. The bottle is chic and stylish, it looks like something you'd fine in a super fashionable food bloggers spice cabinet. Best part; Christin Wingo produces her small batch products in Boulder. 

2. BLT Lunch, Cafe Aion, $10. Nothing says "I love you" quite like bacon. More specifically, nothing says I love you more than a Cafe Aion BLT. The art of food is truly elevating simple dishes to new heights. Aion's BLT looks unassuming enough: Like a classed up sandwich. Yet, after one bite you realize this is not your average lunch fare. It's hard to describe what exactly makes this so amazing, it would be like explaining Bigfoot or the Bermuda Triangle. However, the bacon is cooked to perfection, the bread is crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside, and the veggies some how taste more organic. It's a lunch to be adored and admired. 

3. Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts, Chocolatology Class, $90. Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime. Such is the case with chocolates. Sure, they're a nice gift, but once they're gone, they're gone. Nothing is sweeter than learning the fine art with your sig other (or best gal pal). The classes at Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts are perfect for the home cook looking to up their game. Covered in the class: Chocolate ganache truffles, Mendiants, Chocolate Bark and Almond Rochers. This is a super sweet gift that keeps on giving. 

4. Frisk Jewelry "Top Chef" Charm Necklaces, $32-$40. Who hasn't been lured in by one too many hours of the Food Network? (and by "one too many" we mean seven consecutive). We always try to evoke a sense of sentimentality in our jewelry. Whether a charm reminding you of your childhood, or a vintage piece similar to something your Grandma wore, our charm necklaces are no different. These fly out of the store and are often gifted to chefs, bakers or home cooking enthusiasts.